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Open Access Highly Accessed Research

The clinical behavior of mixed ductal/lobular carcinoma of the breast: a clinicopathologic analysis

Aparna Suryadevara1, Lakshmi P Paruchuri1, Nassim Banisaeed2, Gary Dunnington35 and Krishna A Rao45*

  • * Corresponding author: Krishna A Rao krao@siumed.edu

  • † Equal contributors

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU), Springfield, IL, USA

2 Department of Pathology, Memorial Medical Center, 701 North First Street, Springfield, IL 62781, USA

3 Department of Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU), Springfield, IL, USA

4 Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU), Springfield, IL, USA

5 Simmons Cancer Institute at Southern Illinois University, Post Office Box 19677, Springfield, IL 62794-9677, USA

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World Journal of Surgical Oncology 2010, 8:51  doi:10.1186/1477-7819-8-51

Published: 21 June 2010

Abstract

Background

To date, the clinical presentation and prognosis of mixed ductal/lobular mammary carcinomas has not been well studied, and little is known about the outcome of this entity. Thus, best management practices remain undetermined due to a dearth of knowledge on this topic.

Methods

In this paper, we present a clinicopathologic analysis of patients at our institution with this entity and compare them to age-matched controls with purely invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and historical data from patients with purely lobular carcinoma and also stain-available tumor specimens for E-cadherin. We have obtained 100 cases of ductal and 50 cases of mixed ductal/lobular breast carcinoma.

Results

Clinically, the behavior of mixed ductal/lobular tumors seemed to demonstrate some important differences from their ductal counterparts, particularly a lower rate of metastatic spread but with a much higher rate of second primary breast cancers.

Conclusions

Our data suggests that mixed ductal/lobular carcinomas are a distinct clinicopathologic entity incorporating some features of both lobular and ductal carcinomas and representing a pleomorphic variant of IDC.